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Machine ID’d: CL-195-C South Bend 16/24 Metal Lathe

Received this image of a South Bend heavy metal lathe the other day. It was made in the 1950’s, and has a 6 foot bed catalog number CL-195-C. These South Bend lathes are beautiful machines They were built like tanks. As long as you install them properly, keep them clean, keep them trim, and oil the lathe properly they should last forever.

We have a few manuals that cover this lathe. We have a parts manuals with exploded view diagrams that shows the main parts of the lathe here:

These are very helpful when trying to take the the lathes apart or put them back together. Also, locating parts can become easier, but most parts have the part number casted into them. 
We also have a manual that shows explosive view parts break down diagrams of the accessories for these larger lathes like the turrets, collets, steady rest, etc… here:
A lot of people didn’t realize the the threading dial was an accessory. It seems like a common part today, but it is actually possible to do threading well without the dial and the version of How to Run A Lathe explains this procedure
South Bend basically made one book for operations that covered all their lathes, but it is important to find the one that covers the correct vintage, because they made lots of changes to these lathes over the years. They keep the book with the same title “How to Run a Lathe” all through out the years, with different editions. The edition we have here covers this style of lathe, and we’ve enlarged it so it is easier to read:

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Do you want to know more about your machine?

Email us your details with pictures, and we’ll put together the best information we can find. Plus, we can get other readers’ input to help you learn more.

Also, feel free to email us if you want us to share your machine on our site.

Email your information to: info@ozarkwoodworker.com

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Machine ID’d: Nardini MS-1440 E Metal Lathe Labeled Clausing

We identified this Nardini MS-1440 E Metal Lathe after receiving some pictures from a gentleman that said his Nardini lathe had an original Clausing label on it. This was the first Nardini metal lathe we had seen with such a label. We knew Clausing became a reseller of foreign machines, like the Colchester lathes.We see lots of machines sold under different names and labels. JET Tools sold a 1550 that was similar to a Clausing. 
The Nardini 14×40 lathes appear to be the most popular size that are still being used today. They are well built machines manufactured in Brazil as you can see by their flag on the picture below. Every owner I’ve talked to about them has always enjoyed the build and quality. REM sales used to import these lathes and had parts available, but they are no longer supporting them. Feel free to comment below, if you know of a parts supplier. We receive request every month for parts for Nardini.

Sometimes it is difficult for people to figure out which Nardini lathe manual goes with their lathe, because they made a lot of variations in sizes and options that are covered in each manual, and it isn’t possible to label each one in the title. The manual below is the one for this lathe, but it can be hard to tell from the title alone.

The best way to narrow it down is look for the letters distinguishing the series. We’ve added pictures and diagrams of in the descriptions of the manuals to compare them to your lathe. The most important thing to do is compare the knob and handle configurations on the headstock. If you are ever unsure as to which Nardini manual matches your lathe, feel free to email us pictures.

Submit Your Machine
Do you want to know more about your machine?

Email us your details with pictures, and we’ll put together the best information we can find. Plus, we can get other readers’ input to help you learn more.

Also, feel free to email us if you want us to share your machine on our site.

Email your information to: info@ozarkwoodworker.com