Nardini TT-1230 E Metal Lathe

A gentleman contacted us from Canada about this green Nardini TT-1230 E Turn-Tru metal lathe. He just got it, and was needing some wiring diagrams. We had just the manual he needed for the Nardini TT-1230E with the wiring and parts diagrams. More information on it is below. The Nardini TT-1230 E  has a 12″ swing with an 8″ swing over the cross slide. The spindle bore 1 3/8″ with a D1-3 Camlock spindle nose. Maximum spindle speed is 2,000 RPMs. The tailstock has a #3 MT. In 1986 the Nardini TT-1230E sold for $4,795, which is the equivalent to $10,493.13 today.

 

 

 

 Here’s a video of a similar machine:

 


 

 

 

 

 

 Owner’s Operator Instructions and Parts Manual

We carry a instructions and parts manual for this Nardini TT-1230 E at the link below. Nardini manuals are put together very well with all the information you would expect. It has the standard operating instructions with the maintenance and lubrication chart. The manual contains the wiring diagrams and information about making adjustments. The parts diagrams are all explosive view, and show the parts very clearly. This manual covers the TT-1020, TT-1030, TT-1220, TT-1230, TT-125 and TT-150 Turn Tru series.

 

NARDINI TT-1000, 1200, 125, 150 Operator’s Part Manual

Click on image of manual cover above.

 

We carry a lot of Nardini metal lathe manuals. If you have any questions about Nardini metal lathes, feel free to comment below or contact us.
 

Old Rockwell-Delta-Milwaukee Heavy Duty Wood Shaper 43-205, 1340

One of our readers sent us these pictures of what turned out to be an older Rockwell-Delta-Milwaukee heavy duty wood shaper model 43-205 with serial number 78-2093. They were asking us to identify it so he could purchase the correct owner’s manual for it. This shaper is in good condition for it’s age. The serial number dates it to 1949. This was the biggest and heaviest wood shaper that Rockwell-Delta-Milwaukee ever made, and it was modeled after their popular unisaw design.

 

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This shaper model came out in the Delta catalog in 1940 as the model 1340. The wood shaper has a 27″ x 28″ table with the standard 3/4″ spindle. It accepts a total of six interchangeable spindles: 5/16″, 1/2″, 3/4″ and 1″ standard spindles, 1/2″ stub spindle and a 3/4″ extra long spindle. This shaper was advertised as having a wide range of shaper cutter sizes.
 
 
 

 
 
 

Delta-Milwaukee 1953 Catalog Pages on 43-205 & 1340 Wood Shaper

Below are some pages from the Delta-Milwaukee 1953 catalog about the 43-205 and 1340 wood shaper. We have the complete catalog and more on our FREE PDF Catalogs page. This shows more about how this shaper was marketed as well as the available accessories. In 1953, this wood shaper was sold new for $252.00, which is equivalent to $2,278.65 today. I’ve heard of guys picking these up for around $500 today, depending on the condition.

Click to Enlarge

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ROCKWELL Older Heavy Duty Wood Shaper 43-205 & 1340 Operator’s & Parts Manual

We have the owner’s manual that came with this machine available below. It has a lot of nice pictures of the inner workings of the wood shaper, and with instructions on how to change the spindles. The manual has explosive diagrams of all the parts with parts numbers and descriptions, which helps when needing to restore this machine or find parts.

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Rockwell-Delta Older Heavy Duty Wood Shaper 43-205 & 1340 Operator’s & Parts Manual

 

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Machine ID’d: HARDINGE HC & HCT Chucker Metal Lathe Chucking Machines

We’ve had a couple readers ask us questions about Hardinge HC & HCT chucking machines and metal lathes. We recently made available some more manuals for these Hardinge chucking machines. We have Hardinge operator’s, maintenance, and parts manuals for many different vintages, and for the different manual and automatic threading units that were on some of these Hardinge lathes. The Hardinge chucker lathes were workhorses, and even a worn out Hardinge HC & HCT can easily hold tight tolerances. These also had the nickname Kodak Lathe, which is explained below.

 

Hardinge Brothers, Inc. History

Hardinge Cataract lathe

1919 Hardinge Cataract Quick Change Lathe

The American Hardinge Brothers’ origins go back to 1890 in Chicago, when Franklin and Henry Hardinge began developing watchmaker lathes. They purchased the Cataract machine line from Cataract Tool and Optical Co, in 1902. In 1931 Morrison Machine Products purchased Hardinge Brothers and moved them to Morrison’s operations in Elmira, NY. Hardinge Brothers, Inc. machines are well known for their superb quality and dependability. Their popular models are the HLV and the great HLV-H precision lathes. The HC and HCT chucking machines came after WWII. These models were also know as Kodak lathes, because Kodak wanted machines to help in the manufacturing of high quality lens rings, casing, and shells. The engineers from Eastman Kodak Company actually went down to Elmira, NY to work with the engineers at Hardinge to develop these lathes specifically to help with Kodak’s production. That was the original purpose of these lathes, but these lathes also turned out to be great on other jobs as well.

 

Hardinge HCT Lathe Pictures

We received several pictures from some readers looking for information and manuals for their HCT chucker metal lathes. The first set show a HCT with serial #26300, dated 1953. The cross slide was removed for repair and cleaning, and it is missing the threading attachment, which is the “T” in HCT.

 

Hardinge HCT Automatic Threader

Threading attachment shown above

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This next set of pictures is of a Hardinge HCT chucking metal lathe. I’m not sure what the serial number is, but it is the same vintage of HCT lathe as the one above. Obviously, someone has added a VFD at the top left for variable speed control later, and this one is also missing the threading attachment.

 

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Hardinge Manual & Automatic Threading Unit Attachment

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Hardinge made both a manual and automatic threading unit attachment for the chucker lathes, which were the HCT models. The Hardinge chucker lathes don’t have a quick change gearbox to switch feeds for different threads. Instead the Hardinge have a threading attachment unit that follows what is called a lead screw with a certain pitch that is placed on the back end of the spindle.

 

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Lead Screw

Then you have to place the corresponding follower on the follower arm. This follows the lead screw which with the set pitch, and moves the tooling on the other side of the spindle so you can cut the threads. The following pitches for right-handed threads were standard: 12, 13, 14, 16, 18, 20, 24, 28, 32, 36, 40, 48, 50 and 60. Left-handed or special pitches could be custom ordered, and blank lead screws and followers were also sold so you could grind your own threads or leads.

 

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Follower and Follower Arm

 

 

Hardinge Lathe Catalog Information

Below are some excerpts from some Hardinge lathe catalogs about the HC and HC-AT that detail the specifications of these lathes. We also have Hardinge catalogs and bulletins in PDF format free to download here: Hardinge PDF Downloads

 

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1976

 

Operator’s, Maintenance, and Parts Manuals for Hardinge HC, HCT, and HC-AT

 

We have quite a few manuals available that cover the Hardinge HC, HCT, and HC-AT lathes. Here are some Hardinge manuals that would be useful for these models:

HARDINGE HC & HCT Chucking Machine Lathes Operator’s Manual

HARDINGE HC & HCT Chucking Lathe Maintenance Manual

HARDINGE HC & HCT Chucking Lathe Parts Manual

HARDINGE HC Automatic & Manual Threading Unit’s Operator’s Manual ’57

HARDINGE Automatic Threading Unit on Model HC-AT Chucking Machine Operator’s Manual

HARDINGE Automatic Threading Unit on HC Chucking Machine Maintenance Manual

 

 

Do you have a HC or HCT that you would like to share pictures or information about?

Please contact us or leave some comments below.

Machine ID’d: Walker Turner 16″ Band Saw Model MCB1160

Below are some pictures of a Walker Turner 16″ band saw. The gentleman received the band saw without a manual, and the plastic knob on the upper wheel adjustment assembly was broken. He didn’t know which model his band saw was, because Walker Turner didn’t put the model number on the name plate. It only had the serial number as 52BF4A.

According to this serial number we can tell that this is a Walker Turner 16″ Band Saw is a model MCB1160 that was made in the early 50’s. In 1950 the second letter of the serial number indicated which model it was. The “F” stands for model MCB1160. We have an instructions and parts manual listed below, and as for my recommendation on replacing the handwheel, I recommend using Grizzly. They have lots of handwheels at different sizes that can be modified to fit your machines. Here’s a link to them Grizzly Handwheels.

 

Original Catalog Listing from 1950:

The MCB1160 band saw originally sold for $447.50 in 1950. That’s the equivalent to $4,431.14 in today’s money.

Instructions and Parts Manual for Walker Turner 16″ MCB1160 Band Saw:

We have the manual which covers this band saw and the MCB1150 & MCB1151 band saws. It’s a pretty good manual for it’s age. It contains the specifications for these band saws included the recommended motor and blade sizes. The manual covers the general operating instructions as well as instructions for adjusting the blades and tension. There are lubricating instructions and explosive view diagrams of all the parts with parts descriptions.

WALKER-TURNER 1160-1150-1151 16″ Band Saws Operator & Parts Manual

 

 

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Email us your details with pictures, and we’ll put together the best information we can find. Plus, we can get other readers’ input to help you learn more.

Also, feel free to email us if you want us to share your machine on our site.

Email your information to: info@ozarkwoodworker.com

 

Machine ID’d: Rockwell-Delta 20″ Wood Band Saw 28-350

 This gentleman emailed us about a Rockwell 20″ wood band saw that he wasn’t sure what model it was or much about it. This band saw was made around 1957 according to it serial number. Labeled with Rockwell Manufacturing Co.- Delta Power Tools Division. A lot of the machines that Rockwell-Delta made during this time didn’t have model or catalog numbers posted on them. This band saw is a catalog number 28-350, and the standard blade length was 144″.

Originally Sold:
This 28-350 band saw with the basic package was sold for $519.75 in 1957, which is equivalent to $4,413.95 today. Here is the original catalog page:

Instructions and Parts Manual:

We have a printed instructions and parts owner’s manual for the 28-350 and similar 20″ Rockwell-Delta band saws available at the link below. It covers a lot of the specifications of the band saw, and explains what kind of motors Rockwell recommends as well as how to properly install the motor and make adjustments. It also contains operating instructions, adjusting the table, blade tracking, and blade tension for this band saw with explosive view diagrams of all the parts.

 

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Email us your details with pictures, and we’ll put together the best information we can find. Plus, we can get other readers’ input to help you learn more.

Also, feel free to email us if you want us to share your machine on our site.

Email your information to: info@ozarkwoodworker.com

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Machine ID’d: South Bend 13″ x 6′ Metal Lathe Catalog No.1866-C similar to 166-C

We had one of our readers that wanted to learn more about his great 13″ x 6′ South Bend metal lathe. These South Bend lathes are beautiful machines They were built like tanks. As long as you install them properly, keep them clean, keep them trim, and oil the lathe properly they should last forever.

The serial number of his lathe was No. 50328 and the catalog number was stamped 1866-C as you can see in the picture below. This information dates his lathe around 1931. The reader wanted some clarification as to if the 1866-C was misstamped, because most of the information and advertisements with a similar machine show the catalog number as 166-C.

 

The 1866-C is a real and correct catalog number for your lathe. The difference between the 1866-C and the 166-C is the 1866-C was considered a “Tool Room Precision Lathe”, which came with various attachments like the collet attachment, taper attachment, threading dial, etc…

This particular South Bend lathe is part of the “N” series, which is distinguished mainly by the design of the apron. The “N” series wasn’t in production for very long. South Bend started producing them around 1930. It was replaced by the “R” series after 1934, and that is what South Bend used to the end. They sold the “N” until about 1937. There is always a lot of overlap with South Bend on some of their parts.

Here are some pictures of the South Bend Lathe after it has been cleaned some.

 

Manuals for South Bend 13″ x 6′ Metal Lathe Catalog No.1866-C

We have a few manuals that cover this South Bend 13″ x 6′ Metal Lathe Catalog No.1866-C. We have new revised parts manual that shows the main parts of the lathe here:

 

These are very helpful when trying to take the the lathes apart or put them back together. Also, locating parts can become easier, because most parts have the part number casted into them.
We also have a manual that shows explosive view parts break down diagrams of the accessories for these larger lathes like the, taper attachment, milling attachment, threading dial, turrets, collets, steady rest, etc… here:
A lot of people didn’t realize the the threading dial was an accessory. It seems like a common part today, but it is actually possible to do threading well without the dial and the version of How to Run A Lathe explains this procedure.
South Bend basically made one book for operations that covered all their lathes, but it is important to find the one that covers the correct vintage, because they made lots of changes to these lathes over the years. They keep the book with the same title “How to Run a Lathe” all through out the years, with different editions. The edition we have here covers this style of lathe, and we’ve enlarged it so it is easier to read:


 

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Machine ID’d: Atlas Press Company Model 1010 12 3/4″ Bench Top Drill Press

 

Here are some pictures of a nice Atlas 1010 12 3/4″ bench top drill press. This particular drill press has serial number 000355. These drill press models were made in the early 1950’s.

 

 

 

 

 

 

We have manuals for a few different Atlas drill presses, and we have a manual for the 1010 drill press here:
The Atlas Press Co. 12 3/4″ drill press model 1010 sold for $74.50 in 1950, which is equivalent to $720.48 today. Here is a page on the model 1010 drill press from a 1950 Atlas Press Co. catalog.

Do you have one of these drill presses, or
do you have anything else you would like to add about it’s history or use?
Please add your comments below.

Submit Your Machine
Do you want to know more about your machine?

Email us your details with pictures, and we’ll put together the best information we can find. Plus, we can get other readers’ input to help you learn more.

Also, feel free to email us if you want us to share your machine on our site.

Email your information to: info@ozarkwoodworker.com