Machine ID’d: Atlas V42 10″ Metal Lathe Restored

Here is an image from a reader that nicely rebuilt and restored this Atlas 10 inch metal lathe model V42 with serial number 05140. This is a older version of the Atlas 10 inch lathe, because it has babbit bronze bushings and doesn’t have a pull knob to engage the power cross feed on the apron. We actually used to have a similar model in our shop.

 

The reader said that he had our parts and instructions manual for this lathe, which we have here:

 

 

This manual covers the following models.
  • For Atlas timken bearing lathes:
    with horizontal countershaft-Cat. Nos.: TH36, TH42, TH48, TH54
    with vertical countershaft-Cat. Nos.: TV36, TV42, TV48, TV54
  • For Atlas babbitt bearing lathes:
    with horizontal countershaft-Cat. Nos.: H36, H42, H48, H54
    with vertical countershaft-Cat. Nos.: V36, V42, V48, V54
  • For Atlas quick-change lathes:
    Cat. Nos.: QC42 and QC54

This manual does cover the basics. It explains lubrication, and labels the different controls of the lathe. The reader said that he wanted more information about the operation of the lathe. He’s not the only person that has asked us about this, and that is why we carry the Manual of Lathe Operations and Machinist Tables books, which is full of almost everything you would want to know to get started, plus it contains information on the gear and machinist tables for threading.

The problem with these books is that Atlas and Craftsman sold thousands of these over many decades. They made changes to the books as they made changes to the lathes, but they never stated on the cover or in the book which manual covers which vintage and size of lathe. We’ve collected over 25 of these books and have done the research for you, and we have the one that covers this lathe at the link below:

 

 

 
 

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How to: Replace V-Belts on Atlas or Craftsman Metal Lathe Headstock Spindle

 

We receive many request for instructions on how to replace the v-belts in the headstock of Atlas or
Craftsman 10″ or 12″ metal lathes frequently.

Replacing the belts on the motor and countershaft of these lathes are fairly self-explanatory, because they are relatively easy to access. But in order to fit a normal belt around the spindle pulley, you have to take the spindle out, grease it, put it back in, and realign and adjust everything.  

As a side note: Never use a steel pipe or some other hard metal to knock a spindle out of any machine. You should use wood or I recommend PVC pipe. PVC pipe is really cheap, and you can get it in a variety of diameters. I have a stack of PVC pipes in my shop that I use just for this purpose.

Atlas and Craftsman published different version of the Manual of Lathe Operation for the various models and vintages of lathes they manufactured over the years, and these books give step-by-step instructions with a diagram on how to properly remove the spindle and replace the belts. They also cover how to properly realign the spindle and the backgear once you get everything back together. We actually carry six different versions of this book on our site at the link below:

 

Atlas Craftsman Manual of Lathe Operations

This isn’t an easy task, and can be time consuming if you take your time and do it right. Plus, you are increasing the risk of damaging something. These Atlas and Craftsman Manual of Lathe Operation books are full of a lot more information on these lathes, which I highly recommend, but unless you are really needing to dissemble your headstock on your lathe, there is a much easier way to replace your v-belt on your spindle. That is to use link-belts.

Link-belts are made up of individual pieces that allow you to adjust the size of the belt to any length. You can simply cut off the old belt, place the pre-measured link belt around the spindle, and link it back together. Put it on the countershaft, make sure everything is tight, and you are ready to go. The link-belts are designed for v-belt pulleys, and can actually reduce vibration and provide more torque. We use them on all the machines in our shop. That’s why we make them available here at the link below:

http://www.ozarkwoodworker.com/12-x-1ft-Link-V-Belt-Type-A4L-BDH-DuroDrive-Replacement-Belts_p_916.html

 

If you have any other suggestions or questions, please feel free to leave a comment below.

Machine ID’d: Atlas 12×36 Bench Top Metal Lathe Model 3983

Received these images of a Atlas 12×36 bench top metal lathe. This is Atlas metal lathe is a model 3983. These were produced in the 60’s. Atlas also made this lathe with a quick change gear box. If you bought this lathe without the quick change gear box, Atlas sold it separately with instructions on how to install it here: ATLAS/CRAFTSMAN 12″ Newer Quick Change Gear Box Installation, Instructions & Parts Manual

The reader said that he had our parts and instructions manual for this lathe, which we have here:
This manual does cover the basics. It explains lubrication, and labels the different controls of the lathe. The reader said that he wanted more information about the operation of the lathe. He’s not the only person that has asked us about this, and that is why we carry the Manual of Lathe Operations and Machinist Tables books, which is full of almost everything you would want to know to get started, plus it contains on the gear and machinist tables for threading.
The problem with these books is that Atlas and Craftsman sold thousands of these over many decades. They made changes to the books as they made changes to the lathes, but they never stated on the cover or in the book which manual covers which vintage and size of lathe. We’ve collected over 20 of these books and have done the research for you, and we have that covers this lathe is the one here:
This book covers the newer style 12″ lathes that Atlas produced, and it specifically covers the one that had a pull-knob to engage the power cross feed. Atlas also made it with a lever mechanism to engage the power cross feed, which we have here. Both books cover the lathe with and without a gearbox.
NO Knob or Lever
Knob
Lever
Do you have one of these lathes, or
do you have anything else you would like to add about it’s history or use?
Please add your comments below.

Submit Your Machine
Do you want to know more about your machine?

Email us your details with pictures, and we’ll put together the best information we can find. Plus, we can get other readers’ input to help you learn more.

Also, feel free to email us if you want us to share your machine on our site.

Email your information to: info@ozarkwoodworker.com